Outlaw bikies to be banned from visiting their mates in jail as government moves to halt drug-smuggling in prisons

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  • New legislation to stop outlaw bikies from visiting their associates in prisons  
  • South Australian Government also moves to stop to drug trafficking in jails
  • New bill set to make it impossible for outlaw bikie gangs to operate out of prison
  • Correctional Minister says government determined to end prison drug trade

Outlaw bikies are set to be banned from visiting their associates in jail as part of a crackdown on drug smuggling in prison.

The South Australian government will introduce two key pieces of legislation that will enforce a blanket ban for bikies from visiting a prison, the ABC reported.

The legislation will cut communication between drug dealers inside and outside prisons.

Outlaw bikies are set to be banned from visiting their associates in jail to crack down on drug smuggling in prison (stock image)

Outlaw bikies are set to be banned from visiting their associates in jail to crack down on drug smuggling in prison (stock image)

The South Australian government will introduce two key pieces of legislation that will enforce a blanket ban on bikies from visiting prisons, the ABC reported

The South Australian government will introduce two key pieces of legislation that will enforce a blanket ban on bikies from visiting prisons, the ABC reported

The new bill will also enforce workplace testing to detect illegal drugs and alcohol for prison staff, prison officers and contractors.

The testing is also extended to G4S officers at Mount Gambier Prison as well as staff and officers in private correctional facilities.

South Australian prisons have detained 162 prisoners as of April of this year who are known associates of bikie gangs.

The SA government is determined to put an end to drugs being trafficked into prisons, said Correctional Services Minister Corey Wingard.

Mr Wingard believes the legislation will make it impossible for outlaw bikie gangs to operate out of jail. 

We're going very, very hard on this because we have zero tolerance,' Mr Wingard said.

SA police and the Correctional Services Department will work closely together to implement the ban.

Mr Wingard added that the current Correctional Service Act has no power stop criminal gang members from visiting prisons and communicating with their associates.

The former government outlawed ten bikie gangs. For bikie members, that law also came with new restrictions on wearing logos, displaying gang colours and having meetings.

The new bill will enforce workplace testing to detect illegal drugs and alcohol for prison staff, prison officers and contractors

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Shri Gayathirie Rajen
Source of News article: 
dailymail.co.uk




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