Fri
26
Oct
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Local motorcycle club president sentenced to 12 years for aggravated assault

MIDLAND, TX (KWES) - A Midland jury convicted a president of a local motorcycle gang to 12 years in jail for the aggravated assault of his wife.

The jury convicted Juan Manuel Aguilar, Jr. on October 24 for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon.

According to the trial, on August 4, 2017 Aguilar pointed a gun near his wife’s face. However she moved her arms and knocked the gun out of the way, meaning when he pulled the trigger the bullet was discharged into the ceiling.

She then fled to the front desk of the hotel they were staying in and got an employee to dial 911.

Aguilar was at the time the president of the regional chapter of the Kinfolk Outlaw Motorcycle Gang.

He was found guilty following two hours of deliberation and sentenced to 12 years in jail with a $5,000 fine.

Thu
11
Oct
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San Antonio judge hands star witness in Bandidos trial five years in prison, instead of life

(2 images) --- A former high-ranking member of the Bandidos who was the first to publicly testify about the inner workings and criminal dealings of the outlaw motorcycle club was sentenced Wednesday to a reduced sentence of five years in prison without parole.

“I want to apologize to my family for everything I put them through,” Justin Cole Forster, 34, told Senior U.S. District Judge David Ezra. “I take responsibility for my actions. I am truly sorry for my actions. … I’m ready to put this behind me and move on with my life and be a contributing member of society.”

The judge noted that Forster was “no meek and mild participant in the Bandidos. This was no Don Knotts so to speak.”

Wed
03
Oct
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San Antonio judge sentences Bandido turned informant to 15 years without parole

A former high-ranking member of the Bandidos Motorcycle Club who helped federal authorities convict the top two leaders of the biker gang received 15 years without parole Wednesday, making a tearful apology and promising to continue to cooperate

“I’m remorseful for what I’ve done. I apologize to the family of Anthony Benesh,” “Downtown” Johnny Romo, 48, told the judge, crying. “ I took a man’s life. It’s been a heavy burden on me for many years. Now I have to live with it.”

Romo rose to become a sergeant-at-arms in the Bandidos’ national chapter before he turned informant and became a key prosecution witness in the three-month trial of former national president Jeffrey Fay Pike and then-vice president John Xavier Portillo. The pair were sentenced last week to life in prison without parole for leading the Bandidos’ racketeering conspiracy.

Tue
02
Oct
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Bandido gets 13 years without parole for retaliation killing near San Antonio

A former Bandidos member who participated in the killing of another man 16 years ago was sentenced Tuesday to 13 years in federal prison without parole, plus five years of supervision after his release.

Frederick “Fast Fred” Cortez, 50, was charged in a racketeering case that took down the top leaders of the Bandidos Motorcycle Club. It wasn’t until federal authorities squeezed the Bandidos that Cortez admitted he helped shoot Robert Lara at a rest stop south of San Antonio in January 2002.

Cortez pleaded guilty in October 2016 to murder in aid of racketeering for Lara’s killing.

Lara was killed because he was suspected of slaying a Bandido in late 2001, according to testimony during the three-month trial of the Bandidos’ former national vice president John Xavier Portillo and ex-president Jeffrey Fay Pike. Pike and Portillo were sentenced last week to life in prison without parole for leading the racketeering conspiracy.

Thu
27
Sep
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Former president of Bandidos biker gang gets life in prison

Jeffrey Fay Pike sentenced Wednesday in San Antonio

SAN ANTONIO - Jeffrey Fay Pike, the 63-year-old former national president of the Bandidos Outlaw Motorcycle Organization, was sentenced Wednesday to life in prison by a federal judge in San Antonio.

The sentence, plus 10 years, was handed down months after Pike was convicted on numerous racketeering and drug trafficking charges.

Pike received his sentence a day after former Bandidos national vice president, John Xavier Portillo, was sentenced to two consecutive life sentences plus 20 years in federal prison, a release from the U.S. District’s Attorney’s Office said.

“As I have said before, this prosecution shows that the Department of Justice has the tools to strip away a veneer of legitimate activity to expose and punish underlying criminal conduct. Others—and not only those involved in violent activity—should take note,” stated U.S. Attorney John F. Bash.

Mon
24
Sep
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High-ranking Bandidos member tied to 2006 Austin killing sentenced to life in prison

The former national vice president of the Bandidos Motorcycle Club received two consecutive life sentences and an additional 20 years in federal prison on Monday following his conviction in May on drug trafficking and racketeering charges.

John Xavier Portillo, 59, was also ordered to surrender his motorcycle, three firearms and nearly $18,000 in cash that were seized in 2016, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

Portillo, along with Bandidos’ national president Jeffrey Fay Pike, 63, was convicted on more than a dozen counts, including some in connection with the killing of Anthony Benesh, who was trying to start a Texas Chapter of the Hell’s Angels, a rival club, in Austin. 

Mon
24
Sep
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San Antonio man, the Bandidos one-time second in command, could get life in prison

(photo gallery) --- The Bandidos Motorcycle Club’s former second in command, a San Antonio man who directed the biker group’s violent racketeering enterprise, including drug dealing, extortion, beatings and murder, is expected to be sentenced Monday to life in prison.

Senior U.S. District Judge David Ezra is scheduled to sentence John Xavier Portillo, the national vice president of the Bandidos, at a morning hearing. Portillo, 58, served as second in command for national president Jeffrey Fay Pike, 62, of Conroe, who led the club for more than a decade.

Sun
23
Sep
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Suspected Mongol member involved in fight at Fort Worth hotel bar, police say

FORT WORTH

A fight erupted early Sunday at a hotel bar involving a suspected Mongol biker member that drew the attention of 10 patrol cars, but no serious injuries were reported, police said.

In addition, police said Sunday no arrests were made.

Police have been on high alert this weekend after agents with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives alerted local authorities the motorcycle gang had a rally planned in the city.

The Mongols have been called the “most violent and dangerous” outlaw motorcycle gang in the nation, according to the Department of Justice website.
 

Sun
23
Sep
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Who are the Mongols anyway? Here’s what the biker club says about being in Fort Worth

(video) --- On Saturday night, members of the Mongols motorcycle gang stood outside a bar in the Fort Worth Stockyards, talking with bar employees and passersby.

A woman across the street appeared to take a picture of the four men, who were all wearing black leather vests with patches saying “Mongols” and “Lifetime member.”

Two of them, one of whom introduced himself as Blade, yelled across the street.

“Wait, take another one!” he said, posing with his arm around another member and smiling broadly.

The woman put her phone down and walked away.

Wed
19
Sep
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Motorcycle Clubs are breaking the "outlaw" stereotype

Motorcycle clubs meet at the VFW every Thursdays

SAN ANGELO, TX - Motorcycle Clubs are breaking the "outlaw" stereotype that has been pinned to them.

The Club Manager at VFW, Janet Sheppard, says, "I've been asked many times why I let the motorcycle clubs hang out at the VFW. Most of the times the people in these motorcycle clubs are either active duty or veterans, and the VFW is there home."

As non-members of the American Motorcyclist Association, and incidents, such as the shootout involving MC affiliates in Waco, Texas, are some of the things that created the outlaw stereotype of motorcycle clubs.

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